About your Search

20121202
20121210
STATION
MSNBCW 4
KQEH (PBS) 3
CNNW 2
MSNBC 2
CNBC 1
CSPAN 1
CSPAN2 1
KCSM (PBS) 1
KRCB (PBS) 1
KTVU (FOX) 1
WJZ (CBS) 1
WMAR (ABC) 1
LANGUAGE
English 25
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
, and same sex marriage is simply an issue of civil rights. cnn's gloria borger tells us how the story of this political odd couple began. >> we now need to resolve this election. >> reporter: it was the historic case that decided the presidency and divided the nation. olson and boyce were the ones on the steps of the supreme court battling it out. that was then. this is now. on the streets of new york, they're talking anything but the law. >> it is called crazy heart, jeff bridges. >> i know, i know. i haven't seen that. i want to see that, though, and avatar. >> reporter: yethey have come a long way. let me play a game with you. great lawyer. >> ted. >> david. >> reporter: that's too easy. the adversaries are now friends, really good friends. and when we asked to meet with them, they suggested a personal spot. david boyce's apartment in new york city. if anybody had said to me nine years ago that i would about to be interviewing the two men who fought each other tooth and nail in bush versus gore on the same side of a constitutional fight, i would have said, are you crazy? >> actuall
. ♪ get your coupon today at tastelift.coffee-mate.com. >>> civil rights, upholding the constitution, the supreme court makes decisions that impacts us every day. why are they hearing a custody case coming up today? >>> how this could have happened? a cop's gun is fire
station back on new year aday in 2009. at 9:00, two civil rights lawyers will argue before the 9th sir coit court of appeals that b.a.r.t. police should not get legal immin tu from this lawsuit filed bay the -- ill munty from this lawsuit filed by the the -- immunity from this lawsuit filed by the family of oscar grant. >>> coming up at 7:47, how the kansas city chiefs and their community responded to the jovan belcher tragedy. >>> four people including three firefighters are still in the hospital this morning after a serious accident in other rin da. it happened on -- orinda. it happened on eastbound 24 near wilder road. it all started when an suv crashed into the center divide. while one of the drivers and three firefighters were standing on the right shoulder, another suv lost control pushing another car into them. they were all rushed to the hospital with major injuries. >>> the weekend storm brought major problems to the south bay and that had actuallity workers and law enforcement working overtime. a man, woman and child were were stuck in their car after flooding on east capita
the country? and all the fingers kept pointing back to alec. >> when civil rights and grassroots groups learned about alec's connection to stand-your-ground laws, they were outraged. >> alec doesn't do its work alone. they do it with some of the biggest corporate brands in america. >> before long, corporations were pulling out of alec, including coca-cola, kraft foods, mcdonald's, mars, proctor & gamble, johnson & johnson. caught in the glare of the national spotlight, alec tried to change the subject. >> you know, i think the entire debate needs to be reframed. and really what alec is, is a bipartisan association of state legislators. we have legislators of all political stripes coming together to talk about the most critical issues facing the states and trying to come up with the best solutions to face some of the problems that we're having. >> all right, so your point is it's not a partisan organization. >> but alec is partisan, and then some. >> in the spring i got a call from a person who said that all of the alec bills were available and was i interested in looking at them. and i
civil rights and they said that the senate was ending revenge for gettysburg and the rules of the senate have lent themselves -- back then, it blocked civil rights but it wasn't a work a day kind of obstructionist. as horrible as it was blocking civil rights legislation. today is it is almost everything. you need 60 votes. it doesn't even -- the majority leader can't even bring a bill up to debate without a 60 votes if the minority wants to force 60 votes. that's got to change. the selection -- the confirmation of federal judges and less than cabinet level appointees, those kinds of things are just obstructionism, period. when in the past, we always were able to just bring it forward to get 51 votes. if you don't, you don't. some of these votes will be more aimed to that. certainly to give the minority rights to slow things down but not to block things. almost haphazardly the way they do. >> bill: otherwise it is the tyranny of the minority. >> it really has become that way. so much of what the preside
's really a civil rights issue? >> i don't know if i'm the one to ask. i don't think i'm even for heterosexual marriage. [ laughter ] >> i'm with mark. >> there's an economic benefit to this. obviously catering halls, wedding photographers, caterers, even divorce lawyers can make a lot of money here. the reason i think there has to be some federal law of ruling here, a marriage license has to be portable. people are going to prove state to state. clearly there are gay couples that need all kinds of protections. hospital visitation rights, civil protections of all kinds. i don't know if you call it the same as marriage but i'm starting to move more in that direction. >> stay put. we've got more work to do. 24 days until our economy falls off the tax and fiscal cliff. just where do we stand on a deal coming out of washington, d.c.? cnbc correspondent joins us with all the details. >> reporter: as you know the white house's strategy since the election has been to break republican resistance on two issues. one is tax rates and one is an increase in the debt limit. he hasn't succee
countries that have no beliefs in civil liberties, countries who are terrible on human rights, and we say we're going to put you in charge of decisions -- >> that's not what it does. it forces them to live up to standards that we believe in. >> no, it doesn't. where does it say in there the other countries will live up to our standards? >> that's what the treaty does. it sets down standards. >> it does not say -- >> john, happy holidays. bob shrum -- >> -- giving away all our power. >> sometimes it comes down to how we look at the world. >>> republicans made no secret to keep democrats from voting. is it possible those voter i.d. laws, the photo i.d. laws, actually encouraged african-americans among others to defy the gop and go out and vote. i feel it happened. i have heard that happened. let's hear about it. did it happen? did blacks and others say screw you, you're not going to stop me from voting. let's find out how it worked. tonight, we host "the washington post" report and hear reporting of the university of notre dame that have caused serious claims. finally, what's the most iconic 2
states it increased, like ohio. some civil rights leaders say it was those attempts at voter suppression that drove voters out to vote even if it meant standing in line for hours. what is clear is the republican party has a deeper problem right now. it's failing to attract minority voters largely due to the policies and the rhetoric some of its leaders and their cronies have been using. what's going on? what can the republican party do about it? big questions. j.c. watts, former u.s. congressman from oklahoma. and judith browne dianis. thank you so much. let me ask judith to start with some homework that we couldn't do but we're counting on to you do. people come up to me and said, i was so angry about some of the suppression talk and attempts in those 30-some states. african-americans would say i got out there and i voted. what evidence do you have that it really worked in favor, or rather put it this way, against the republicans for trying to do that? >> well, number one, we know that they tried to do it so that they could have partisan advantage, but we do know it backfired because, n
know, howard baker was everett dirkson's son-in-law. and during the run up to the civil rights bill, howard is sitting up in dirkson's office, phone rings, dirkson picks it up, says -- and all howard can say is him saying, mr. president, i just can't come down tonight, i was there last night. i was there the night before, i just got to go home. hangs up. 20 minutes passed, and he hears beagles barking in the hallway outside his office. and lbj walks in with his dogs. so because he wouldn't come down to see him, johnson called a car, got in and came up to just force a conversation with dirkson. >> and lyndon johnson -- >> and we got a bill. >> and by the way, l lyndon johnson. he's so detached and disconnected from the hill, he would call, mark haleprin, famously, subcommittee chairman in the house. and say, hey, i hear the mark-up didn't go very well today. do you need any help? what can i do? do you need me to call anybody? how can i push this along? again, we're not heaping all the blame on the president. let me underline again. >> yeah. >> john boehner's counter offer was patheti
with the civil rights movement. i do not think that is appropriate. to make it equal with the civil rights with other minorities, i do not think that is right. i think marriage has been defined between a man and a woman to raise our children. we need to continue that, the country is really corroding in terms of morals and values. it will further deteriorated. i think this is a state's right to rule on this, not a supreme court ruling for all of the people. the people should have a voice in whether or not this is acceptable for them. host: that is the last call we will take on this. coming up, we will look at the november jobs report that came out yesterday. joining us for that discussion to talk about the numbers and give us some context is rick newman. we are going to focus on the state of health of the interim america. thomas frieden will be our guest. all weekend long, the history and literary life of albany, new york, capital city. our producers gathered about programming while they were there. there are traveling to state capital to feature history and literary life as he will see fro
historic laws including the civil rights act of 1964. what a life. jack brooks, dead at 89. bill: 25 minutes past the hour. there could soon be a major shortage of primary care doctors. the journal of the medical american association says 22% of internal medicine residents are planning to become internal medicine doctors. what does this mean to you? marc siegl joins us now with the latest on this. doctor, nice to see you. >> good to see you. bill: what does it mean. >> i want to explain to our views out there exactly what an internal medicine doctor is. we always talk about primary care. primary care is a pediatrician, obstetrician, gynecologist for women's health, family practitioner or a general internist, which is what i am. someone who does the internal organs of the pwaopbd say body and says i'm not going to become a lung specialist, i'm going to stay as a general doctor. you're sick, you're having high blood pressure, high cholesterol, i'm the guy you see. people need doctors like that. without doctors like that what are we going to do? there was another study two years ago, th
that many church-goers have changed their views about gay civil rights is one of the most underreported reasons why same-sex marriage is now legal in nine states. it is also one of the reasons that the constitution of prop 8 which took away gay californians right to marry. may get a hearing. the announcement was to be today. probably friday. a majority of main line protestants and roman catholics now favor legalizing same-sex marriage. did you know that? i knew a majority of americans. i did not know a majority of protestants and catholics favor marriage equality. >> that's awesome. >> stephanie: i was quite interested. >> thank you. >> stephanie: so when other more conservative christian kin claim it is against the bible we beg to differ. they wrote this in the "l.a. times," we posted this up on steph stephanie miller facebook. there are only three passages that deal with homosexuality in the new testament. the passages don't deal with homosexuality but with temple prostitution and other abuses. i'm
. and policy is important too there is a whole question around civil rights. i would argue way behind. but representation matters. jay-z famously said on his most recent album, when you see me, see you. politics works the same way. you want success to be shared. you want it to be represented. and i would urge the republicans to think long and hard about how to have a leadership structure that looks more like america. >> you just dropped the mic. i love it. i love it. more from the brain trust on the other side of this break as the supreme court is about to take up same-sex marriage. it is being called a watershed moment in the fight for marriage equality. we'll talk about that on the other side of this break. lashawn's got her christmas list. she's looking for a fijit at toys "r" us. let's see if we can get the same item at walmart for less? okay. fijit friends. fifteen bucks on rollback. wow! that's a savings of over 29 bucks! twenty-nine bucks!!?? and they're powered by friendship. see for yourself if you could save on the brands you want. walmart. >>> this is a monumental action by
with more on her legal moves. >> that's right. staff sergeant jennifer hunt is suing the department of defense, as the civil affairs specialist in the army affairs. hunt has deployed to iraq and afghanistan, even earned a purple heart. hunt says the policy bang women from direct ground missions is illegal. the department of defense says more than 14,000 jobs previously closed. two women have opened up to them this year. denise? >> all right. thank you, kai. hunt says this lawsuit isn't calling for a certain number of combat positions to be open to women. but instead to give women an equal opportunity to compete for the jobs. >>> in wjz's healthwatch, a new study could change the standard of care in breast cancer treatment. new research suggests women should take tamoxifen for 10 years. twice as long as the current five-year recommendation. researchers at the university of oxford found breast cancer patients who took the drug longer, were less likely to die, and less likely to have their cancer come back. >>> well, a former student at frostbur
, that the magnitsky act remain focused scairl and exclusively on russia. that's what russian democrats and civil society groups tell me they want right now. they want congress to send their government a message on human rights and by keeping the magnitsky act focused for now on russia we can do just that. furthermore, the administration can use its own executive authority at this time to apply similar kinds of pressures contained in the magnitsky act to human rights abusers in other countries. i for one will be watching closely to see if they do. for in many other cases are crying out for greater u.s. leadership on behalf of human rights. and if the administration does not take the initiative to apply the leverage at our disposal to these other cases beyond russia, that is the surest way to ensure that the congress will act to globalize the enact next year. there are still many people who look at the magnitsky act as anti--russia. i disagree. i believe it's pro-russia. believe it's pro-russia because this legislation is about the rule of law, and human rights, and accountability which are values
conservatives will likely rebel. more "bill press" up after the break. we will be right back. exciting issue. from financial regulation, iran getting a nuclear bomb, civil war in syria, fraud on wall street, destruction of medicare and medicaid. there are real issues here. having been a governor, i know that trade-offs are tough. things everyday exploding around the world that leave no shortage for exciting conversations. i want our viewer to understand why things have happened. at the end of the show, you know what has happened, why its happened and more importantly, what's going to happen tomorrow. at cepacol we've heard people are going to extremes to relieve their sore throats. oh, okay, you don't need to do that. but i don't want any more of the usual lozenges and i want new cooling relief! ugh. how do you feel? now i'm cold. hmm. this is a better choice. new cepacol sensations cools instantly, and has an active ingredient that stays with you long after the lozenge is gone. ahhh. not just a sensation sensational relief. did you get chips for the party? nope. cheese plate? che
constitution. the fact is that our constitution has been amended 17 times and always to expand rights and never to narrow them except prohibition that got repealed. what's the truth is that this is an issue that has taken hold. it's about civil marriage licenses. there's just been too many people that have now come out and, you know, thousands and millions of individual acts where the american public something the strategists did not anticipate back in 1996 is the american public shifts and as it has become comfortable, they have determined yes, these licenses should be extended. you know, the u.s. supreme court could determine this on narrower grounds, just on the california issue and just strike down doma. then we are left with nine states where you can marry and it would remain unresolved as to the other states. seasoning correct. >> if we are ever going to see civil marriage in alabama, it has to be the u.s. supreme court. i think we are living in an amazing era for gay people. hopefully the supreme court will understand its moment in history and like it has done before, come down on the si
syndrome. 45 minutes after the hour. right back on "the stephanie miller show." >> oh, my! how ruthlessly absurd! >> announcer: it's "the stephanie miller show." exciting issue. from financial regulation, iran getting a nuclear bomb, civil war in syria, fraud on wall let's rock and roll. there is so much going on that every day presents another exciting issue. from financial regulation, iran getting a nuclear bomb, civil war in syria, fraud on wall street, destruction of medicare and medicaid. there are real issues here. having been a governor, i know that trade-offs are tough. things everyday exploding around the world that leave no shortage for exciting conversations. i want our viewer to understand why things have happened. at the end of the show, you know what has happened, why its happened and more importantly, what's going to happen tomorrow. get irresistibly clean and fresh carpets in your home with resolve deep clean powder. the moist powder removes three times more dirt than vacuuming alone while neutralizing odors for a clean you can see, smell and really enj
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)